Tag: description

the carnival

In the night, stars dance across the ceiling as a neon parade swarms the circle. 
Vibrant diversity rings in each color, in each promenade.
A mass of euphoria, of ecstasy, takes over each swing, each dance, each act as they contort themselves, risk themselves, outcast themselves all for the sake of twinkling under the stars.

Me? I'm the ringleader.
I stand high on the tightropes with my hula hoop and flags, signaling for each animal to pass through in their stampede of dissonance.
While everyone else in the audience is a smear of gray, of mob mentality awe, I stand out like a checkered array of black and white.
Ballerinas plie across the wires and ropes;
Contortionists stretch their limbs in mistrewn directions;
Daredevils eat fire and exhale it as if it were nothing but air —
for all the crowd knows, it is.

A parade of misfits, of diversity warps the audience's minds with awe and reaction.
Dazzled in the starry praise for such a moonlight occasion, I, the ringleader twist into a bow:

This life is no carnival,
although things do appear larger than life sometimes;
it's quite the opposite in fact:
Life is a masquerade.

Character Worksheet

This is not necessary, but this can help you if you’re someone who is a planner.

Biological Facts

Full Name:

Reason for Name:

Birthday: (Day, Month, Year)

Reason for choosing this date:

Zodiac:

Mother:

Father:

Siblings (if any):

Significant other(s) (if any):

Children (if any):

IDENTITY-Focus Facts

Sexuality:

Height:

Weight:

Hair: (Color, Length Type, Texture)

Eyes: (Shape, Color)

Face: (Shape, Appearance)

Body: (Type, Appearance)

Clothes: (Type, Details)

Personality-Based Facts:

Positive Traits:

Negative Traits:

Interests:

Hobbies:

Introvert or Extrovert:

Moral Alignment:

Personality Type from 16Personalities:

For appearance details, I suggest mapping out ways you can describe them.

The Dos and Don’ts of Description

As writers, and as we get older in general, description is vital in what we write. Pay attention to detail, they always say. As we age, people expect our attention to specificities to get better and better.

Take this for example:

She had short, curly brown hair. Her eyes were blue. 

While it’s okay to be basic, this is a mistake on a few levels:

  • The details should be spread out amongst the course of the novel, not told immediately.
  • There’s no direct focus other than the character.

Also, what age does the narrator sound like?

(Please, comment your answer below)

When writing, take into account the age, intelligence, and personality of the narrator. Even if it’s in third-person, the narrator should mimic the personality of your focal character.

Now, take this description:

She bounced into her apartment, crystal irises buzzing with the energy surging through her brain. Her perky curls danced on her shoulders as she plopped in front of the blue glow of her computer screen. 

Now, I’m not saying this is ideal. In fact, this is flowery. A lot of metaphors. But I did try to put “her” appearance into action. I also didn’t use simple sentences.

So, in the end, make sure you put the details to action.